By clicking the “Get Your Results” button and submitting my information, I hereby confirm that I understand and agree to the Terms & Conditions, Privacy Policy and the E-Consent, and I understand, agree, and authorize under the Fair Credit Reporting Act that (1) my information may be sent to lending partners, and third party finders / aggregators working on behalf of lenders, on my behalf to complete my request, and (2) that such lending partners, and third party finders /aggregators working on behalf of lenders may obtain consumer reports and related information about me from one or more consumer reporting agencies, such as TransUnion, Experian and Equifax, solely to conduct a prequalification for credit. I hereby agree to receive email communications and calls about loans (which calls may be auto-dialed, use artificial or pre-recorded voices, and/or be text messages) from these companies and their agents to the telephone number(s) I’ve provided.
If you do not pay your loan according to its terms, your lender may: • Charge you late fees • Send your account to a collection agency • Report your information to a consumer reporting agency, which may negatively affect your credit score • Offer to renew, extend or refinance your loan, which may cause you to incur additional fees, charges and interest
Predatory lenders are always happy to offer emergency loans to desperate folks. The problem is that many of the emergency loans out there have interest rates and terms that are likely to lead to a debt spiral. What starts as an emergency lifeline could leave borrowers drowning in debt. Here are some red flags that anyone shopping for an emergency loan should look out for:

Brittney Mayer is a contributing editor for BadCredit.org, where she uses her extensive research background to write comprehensive consumer guides aimed at helping readers make smarter, more informed financial decisions on the path to building better credit. Leveraging her vast knowledge of the financial industry, Brittney’s work can be found on several websites, including the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, US News & World Report, CreditRepair.com, Lexington Law, CardRates.com, and CreditCards.com, among others.

Advertisements for payday loans make them seem like a fast, easy, no-nonsense way to get money when you’re in a financial bind. They tell you getting $100 is as easy as showing a recent pay stub, a copy of your driver’s license, and a blank check. They don’t tell you that for many people, paying off that $100 can end up taking months, even years, and costing thousands of dollars to pay off.
The first time you take out a loan with LendUp, it will be for a fairly low dollar amount (typically $100–250). As it is a short-term loan, you'll have up to 30 days to pay it off. You'll schedule your repayment date when you take out the loan. Working with LendUp could give you the chance to repair or build your credit over time as you get access to the emergency funds you need.
×

What are you Looking for?

Payday Loan Personal Loan
Bad Credit Loan Credit Score Check