Just got a call from a place called themselves Capital Services. A bit aggressive, had my information, what banking bank has and social security number. I run my credit reports every year. These people said they were representing SJM Marketing for a payday loan I took out in 2009 and was defaulted. I have not seen any such place on my reports. They had my address, but not the one I was living in at the time. They had my wife’s new email address, that she did not have at the time. Their number is 646-354-2096.
It sounds like if the caller is breaking the law; a collection agency can not send you to jail. Read 5 Things to Debt Collector Should Never Say “and 11 Ways to Debt Collector May Be Breaking the Law for more information and advice on how to handle calls.
I’m getting calls often, different numbers, started about a week ago.It is scary, and upsetting.Latest is from 1-718-841-6480.Thaey call work, threatens to file charges against me, I will be arrested if I don i pay.A guy tried to get me $ 560 immediately.I didn’t.Help
Even though there may not be a lot you can do about the call, it may be worthwhile to file a complaint with your state attorney general and with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
DeYOUNG: We need to do more research and try to find out the best ways to regulate rather than the rules that are being pursued now that would eventually shut down the industry. I do not want to come as a advocate of payday lenders. That’s not my position. My position is I want to make sure the users of payday loans who are using them responsibly and who are made better by them do not lose access to this product.
of a group called the Consumer Credit Research Foundation, or the CCRF, which is funded by payday lenders. Now, to be clear, Ronald Mann says that CCRF did not pay him to do the study, and did not try to influence his findings; but neither does his paper disclose that the data collection was handled by an industry-funded group. So we went back to Bob DeYoung and asked whether, maybe, it should have.
‘S Eliana Johnson.
So I did call them back, spoke to a different person, to inform them that this is bogus and there is no record of any kind for any payday loan. I started to tell her what the bank associate told me about how payday loans work and if I or someone else did not take these loans there would be a try to collect on in through my bank account. She said she knows how they work and do not need me to explain it to her. She also told me that since they are only a mediation firm that is just looking for volunteer settlements of the debts they are not bound to the Fair Debt and Collections Act and said we are not going to force you to pay this back to our client.
Have a message today from “Courtney” claiming to be a self-employed server and that I am scheduled to be published on the 21st. She said she normally does not call forward but because of the situation she was this time. She said if I was uncomfortable receiving papers for which I did not know about that to contact the originating company. Then she left their number 855-461-0744 and a “case number”. The first thing I did is try to lookup the phone number but no reference to it anywhere on the interwebs? Okay, start to sound fishy. So I call the number, but of course it’s after 7pm Eastern (4: 30p for me) so I get a chance to leave a voicemail. The voicemail greeting was for Jonathan Vadeer?
You are doing all the right things, and it sounds like the calls you are receiving are not legitimate. Please do not give these companies any account numbers (credit card, debit or any other financial account). We’ve written about these scams before. This post may be useful (or reassuring) to you:
I just got a call stating that i was for fees for payday loan company, it really freaked me out because the message left on my answer machine said something about restraining order and they used my maiden name so I called the number left on my machine It was 813-217-5283 I asked for Tina Charles the woman who left her name I got this guy and he said well the loan company that found the lenders got a fee and that’s what i defaulted on i told him i did not see that in any of the sites and he said that sounds ridicules I told him you sound ridicules and then i yelled goodbye and hung up. I would not have given them any money any way but still it freaked me out
I got a call from ACS stating that they would need to get my account settled and that my account was due to go to court due to payday loan fraud, and that i have 24 hours to call back and considered myself served, they also said that they were a lawfirm. They called mt family members and said I had to call them back and that they did not have any credit plans or credit cards or check over the phone. they kept calling on the summons division, what i’m going to do is ask them for a letter, an address of where they are located and their website, ‘
in 1916 under the supervision of Arthur Ham, the first director of the Russell Sage Foundation’s Department of Remedial Loans. Ham recognized a key truth about small, short-term loans: They are expensive for lenders to make. His model law tried to promote short-term legal lending by capping rates at a high level of level-states determined their own ceilings, typically ranging from 36 to 42 percent per year-to enable lenders to turn a profit. This was very controversial, but many Americans still could not secure loans at that rate; their risk of default was deemed too great. Some of them eventually turned to the mob, which grew strong during the Prohibition.
Cost of a payday loan. Many state laws set a maximum amount for payday loan fees ranging from $ 10 to $ 30 for every $ 100 borrowed. A typical two-week payday loan with $ 15 per $ 100 fee equates to an annual percentage rate (APR) of about 400 percent. By comparison, APRs on credit cards can range from about 12 percent to about 30 percent. In many states that allow payday lending, the cost of the loan, fees, and the maximum loan amount are capped.
couple months ago stating that I had taken out a loan in Aug of 2012. They said they had papers for me and that I had to pay right away to avoid legal action. They gave me the bank account number and checking account number that the money was deposited in, had my social security number and knew where
I have been receiving calls from what sounds like the same group of folks. Starting last week I had a message from “Justin Jones” stating that I had to contact him immediately or have my attorney contact him that I would be sorry. If he did not hear from me that I would face some serious legal actions. He also said that they would come to my workplace or home and I will be the only responsible person for further legal consequences and that I should call him bsck as soon as possible before it too late. Thank you and have a blessed day, goodbye. It was very broken Indian dialect. I returned the call and spoke to Derek Anderson. Apparently Justin Jones is one of his “officers.” I was told that They would be willing to settle for $ 998 in place of the $ 1795.00 they said I owed them through Advance Payday Loan. I have never taken a payday loan. I had to give him a debit card or send a payment via Western Union right away or they would have the sheriff come to me on the following three charges. 1 breach of federal banking laws 2 Collateral check fraud, and 3 Theft by deception. I asked for a physical address so that I could send the funds via overnight delivery or some other traceable method. He did not want to give me a physical address but after much questioning from me he gave me an address of 633 Marimbo Street New York, NY 10023 But that they would not accept mail payments, only Western Union (he forgot about the debit and credit card at this point)
In the end, if they can not answer your questions or validate the debt (in writing), it’s probably a scam. In which case you may not be able to do much about the call but you can report them to your local law enforcement, your state attorney general, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. You may even want to inform the caller that you have taken these steps.

Payday Advance In Torrance Ca

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Fulmer says that payday-loan interest rates are not almost as predatory as they seem, for two reasons. First: When you hear “400 percent on an annualized basis,” you might think that people are borrowing the money for a year. But these loans are designed to be held for just a few weeks, unless, of course, they get rolled over a bunch of times. And, reason number two: because payday loans are so small – the average loan is about $ 375 – the fees need to be relatively high to make it worthwhile for the lender. For every $ 100 borrowed, Fulmer says, the lender gets about $ 15 in fees. So, capping the rate at an annualized 36 percent just would not work.
If you are being sued for a debt, you may be served. But they’re not going to just “haul you to jail” just because you can not pay a debt. My suggestion? Ask for written verification of the debt you are entitled to by law. They will not possibly send it.
from her again. I do not know if this is connected, but really regretting the small payday loan online in order to pay my rent when I was out of work. Now I do not know what I’m facing with the legal document threats and can not contact the source caller for information in order to try and resolve whatever is the issue. Now that I read the other postings, I’m not sure if I made a payment to a legitimate source either because just after making the loan random deductions started coming out of my checking account so badly that I had to shut it down. Hope my posting this information helps someone who is thinking about taking a chance with online payday loans, and thank you for the website to share and help others in such need.
I was contacted by someone at my work number saying they are from Quick Cash who bought a debt from Cash Call saying they are coming to my work in an hour. I asked for their phone number and they would not give it to me. Just that if I did not pay over $ 1,000 today, they were coming to my work. They would not give me any information. Sounded like a call center. They said they had a case against me in the county where I live. Well, I work for a firm firm and look up online to see, there are no cases against me. How do I get them to stop when I have no phone number or information? Thank you!
going to be sent to court for “fraud” and continued to talk and talk and talk. But as I listened to her, I caught her in many lies. And on top of that she did not sound professional at all and kept repeating my name over and over trying to break me down. Then I asked to talk to the supervisor and she said, “I’m so scam” and I said, “I heard her whispering to someone else and then she came back on the phone and I told you that they are not a scam and I replied with “I can talk to your supervisor” and then she put me on “Hold” then I heard the phone being held up to a speaker so I could hear “elevator” music while I was being “transferred” to the supervisor. She finally transferred me to this guy saying that I could pay her with a gift card instead. I just said “I’ll think about if I want to pay you scam artists or not” then I hung up. Since then, I’ve gotten nothing.
Freakonomics Radio is produced by WNYC Studios and Dubner Productions. Today’s episode was produced by Christopher Werth. The rest of our staff include Arwa Gunja, Jay Cowit, Merritt Jacob, Greg Rosalsky, Kasia Mychajlowycz, Alison Hockenberry and Caroline English. Thanks also to Bill Healy for his help with this episode from Chicago. If you want more Freakonomics Radio, you can also find us on Twitter and Facebook and do not forget to subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or anywhere else you get your free, weekly podcasts.
Jason – It absolutely sounds like the classic overseas payday loan scam. Do not send them a penny. Remember, in the US a debt collector is required to send notification of the debt to you in writing. If he does not, he’s breaking the law. Report these guys to the FTC and your state attorney general.
Whatever you want to call it – wage deflation, structural unemployment, the absence of good-paying jobs – is not that a bigger problem? And, if so, what’s to be done about that? Next time on Freakonomics Radio, we will continue this conversation by looking at a strange, controversial proposal to make sure everyone’s got enough money to get by.
MANN: The data really suggests that there is a relatively small group of borrowers, in the range of 10 to 15 percent, who have been extremely heavy users, whose predictions are really bad. And I think that group of people seems to fundamentally not understand their financial situation.
Cash advances often cost 3 to 5 percent of the amount being borrowed. When made on a credit card, the interest is often higher than other credit card transactions. The interest compounds daily starting from the day cash is borrowed.
actually be profitable, deliver the product. Now that’s, that’s not the only plank in the CFPB’s platform. They advocate limiting rollovers and cooling-off periods and the research does not indicate that in states where rollovers are limited, payday lenders have got around them by paying the loan off by refinancing. Just start a separate loan with a separate loan number, evading the regulation. Of course that’s a rule that was poorly written, if the payday lenders can evade it that easily.
If it was legit she would have no problem giving the address to the company. She will not divulge this information as she does not want to be sued for illegal collection tactics. Ignore them and move on.
people had the same story about these people. So I called them back and I asked them to give me the address of their business location and he gave me 1001 State stree, more than 1400, Erie Pa. I googled this address and found out that this address belongs to Moody Law Offices 814-464-9464. I called Moody Law Office and asked them they were affiliated with Law firm Anthony H Rodriguez and they said they did not hear of them and they were not affiliated with them. I called Anthony H Rodriguez back and confronted them about this, and he started cursing and they hung up on me. I’m so happy I did not give them any money.
I thought it was his first name that he was a process server and that ii was being prosecuted for fraud on a payday loan this person also called my family members and told them the same thing she said she was calling from ACS litigation i called and gave the I did not know what to do, but I did not have to say that they would like to have me. They also said when they tried to get paid the bank account was close and they said this was back in 2007 the number they used is 866-574-8858 they also said they would prosecute does anyone anything or can help me
I gotten calls from PDLR- IT’S A SCAM! Beware for Miss Berry, Miss Santiago, or Miss Stiles, who all claim to be supervisors! The said my salary is going to be garnished in 2 days, we had a very heated exchange in which Miss Berry started talking about my mother, lol. Then when I insisted on the proof of the debt, how much, and who they are, they told me that I would get an email after the 1st payment is made. Initially I thought it was a legitimate debt & gave my credit card info, but after googling this agency I’ve found it a scam. Called my bank & reported it immediately.
Diane Standaert is the director of state policy at the Center for Responsible Lending, which has offices in North Carolina, California, and Washington, D.C. The CRL calls itself a “nonprofit, non-partisan organization” with a focus on “fighting predatory lending practices.” You’ve probably figured out that the CRL is anti-payday loan. Standaert argues that payday loans are often not used how the industry markets them, as a quick solution to a short-term emergency.
There is a long and often twisted history of industries co-opting scientists and other academic researchers to produce findings that make their industries look safe or more reliable or otherwise better than they really are. Whenever we talk about academic research on this show – which is pretty much every week – we try to show the provenance of that research and establish how legitimate it is. The best first step in figuring that out is to ask what kind of incentives are at play. But that is only one step.
Please do not panic. You can not be arrested because you can not pay this debt. If they call again, you can not reply until they send something in writing on their letterhead by mail (not email!). That’s your right under federal law. (A warrant for check fraud is a sign you are dealing with a scammer. That’s not check fraud
This morning I received a call, and my father did as well, from 716-244-6551. I was given a number ID. I do not answer unknown numbers. I call back after hearing a voice mail. My dad told me that they issued a warrant for my arrest in Bexar County. I called them back because the voicemail they left was basically stating the same thing.

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