Ann, I just got a call last week from the same phone number. A “Juan Hernandez” has called me saying I owed on a payday loan; that it was taken out in 2008 and when the company tried to collect in 2009, there were insufficient funds. They are threatening to suspend my driver’s license unless I pay them $ 300 within 48 hours – after that, it becomes $ 1400. I was so upset, I went to the bank and got all my bank statements from December 2008 to present. Nothing returned for insufficient funds. Mr. Hernandez just called me at work today and I’m about to call him back. What a scam – happy you did not fall for it!
I can not tell from what you are writing whether it’s a very aggressive debt collector, but remember the debt collectors must follow federal law (and often state laws) that prohibits harassment and false statements.
Maybe that’s about as good as it gets on the fringe. Outrage is easy, and outrage is warranted-but maybe payday lenders should not be its main target. The problem is not just that people who desperately need a $ 350 loan can not get it at a affordable rate, but that a growing number of people need that loan in the first place.
We had never heard of this happening until we got a call today from 410-843-2822. They had left a message with my fiance and when I returned the calll they first said “hello”, which struck me as strange, since this was supposedly a law office. When I asked for the name of the company he kept trying to verify info. When Chad (my fiance) got on the phone they started telling him that he should answer q’s carefully as they could be used against him in court. They said that the case would be ‘downloaded’ with the courts – what kind of lawyer says that? We had applied for several loans, and had only accepted one – what we were paying back. The amount they said we owed we had never been quoted. The other strange thing is that although they both had very strong indian accents, they used very unlikely names – the supervisor said his name was Jack O’Connor. ?? ?? DO NOT FALL FOR THIS !!!! We told them to send us something in the mail and not to call again.

Payday Advance Online No Fax

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Counselors and Lawyers with Nationwide business operations. They called me multiple times alleging that my mother owed a $ 2,000 debt for writing bad checks. They said that the party wanted to prosecute and provided a fake address and social security number that was supposedly my mother’s. They did not provide any website, no bar number and
told him he had been reported to the authorities and they were investigating. He yelled at me and said something to the effective having his “balls to my throat and how did I like that” then hung up. I have heard and more. I’m terrified to go to work. The numbers are a NJ number starting with a 973 area code and the company number starts with 646 (NY). Beware!
Cost of a payday loan. Many state laws set a maximum amount for payday loan fees ranging from $ 10 to $ 30 for every $ 100 borrowed. A typical two-week payday loan with $ 15 per $ 100 fee equates to an annual percentage rate (APR) of about 400 percent. By comparison, APRs on credit cards can range from about 12 percent to about 30 percent. In many states that allow payday lending, the cost of the loan, fees, and the maximum loan amount are capped.
There is no surefire way to stop them other than to use some kind of call screening service where only calls you approve go through. You can get some ideas from this piece I wrote: http:
Diane Standaert is the director of state policy at the Center for Responsible Lending, which has offices in North Carolina, California, and Washington, D.C. The CRL calls itself a “nonprofit, non-partisan organization” with a focus on “fighting predatory lending practices.” You’ve probably figured out that the CRL is anti-payday loan. Standaert argues that payday loans are often not used how the industry markets them, as a quick solution to a short-term emergency.
consumers, is going too far. Under the plan it is now considering, lenders would have to make sure that borrowers can repay their loans and cover other living expenses without extensive defaults or reborrowing. These actions would really seem to curtail the possibility of people falling into debt traps with payday lenders. But the industry argues that the rules would be put out of business. And while a self-serving howl of pain is precisely what you would expect from any industry under government fire, this appears, based on the business model, to be true-not only would the regulations eliminate the very loans from which the industry makes its money, but they would also introduce significant new underwriting costs on every loan.
This morning I received a call, and my father did as well, from 716-244-6551. I was given a number ID. I do not answer unknown numbers. I call back after hearing a voice mail. My dad told me that they issued a warrant for my arrest in Bexar County. I called them back because the voicemail they left was basically stating the same thing.
thank you Geri this makes my mind at ease even though deep down inside i thought i was right .. i know i owe them the money .. thank you so much i wish other ppl would research this so they do not get scamed. .
If you are being sued for a debt, you may be served. But they’re not going to just “haul you to jail” just because you can not pay a debt. My suggestion? Ask for written verification of the debt you are entitled to by law. They will not possibly send it.
They are not calling
her company would then move forward in garnishing my salary. If I accepted the settlement offer they would contact American Cash Advance and I would receive a paid in full letter from them. I have not received any such documentation. When I called Ms. Gilbert today to let her know I did not receive the pay in full letter from the original creditor she told me that there was nothing she could do – she did her job and that’s all she had to do and was not interested in helping me. I contacted her supervisor, Ms. Martinez (ext.260) and she told me she would look in the matter for me and return my call. I paid the amount that I was offered in the settlement because I did not want my employer to be contacted – even though I suspected this was a scam.
In your case it sounds so much like the rest of the scams others have shared here on this post so it’s wise to keep on guard. The next time they call, try to get as much contact information about the company – including address, contact phone, name, etc. – then ask them to please provide written documentation in the mail to validate the debt. As we have stated in previous posts, this is a standard procedure when dealing with any debt collector and by law, the collector must comply with this request. If they refuse, they are breaking the law under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and have no right to continue to try to collect. In fact, under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, if a collector contacts you by phone they have 5 days in which to send you formal written notice that you owe the debt. The notice must include the amount of the debt, the name of the creditor, and your right to dispute the debt, in writing, within 30 days of receipt of the notice.
They called my 87-year-old mother and she asked them how they got her phone number, and a woman said that I had put her down as a contact. However, her new phone number is barely a year old and is not the one given at the time of the payday loan.
Sadly, these types of scammers are good at what they do and very convincing. They prey on consumers that are not aware of the rules and use scare tactics to convince them otherwise. You hit the nail on the head with this:
has been slammed with an unexpected bill and no cash on hand to cover it. If you ignore the expense, things may only get worse. But your next paycheck is still a long way away.
Nona – There are a few options for trying to stop them but it’s not easy when you’re dealing with a scam. If they were legitimate collectors, and traceable – where they could be held accountable under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, consumers would recourse to sue them. However, with scams, it’s a little more difficult … but there are some options that may help – you can file a complaint with your local law enforcement, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and your state attorney general.
I googled both numbers but nothing comes up, not even as fraudulent number, so they may be newer numbers. That’s why I wanted to post this in case someone else googles those numbers. She did not disclose any specific information about the charges, did not say it was a debt collection or anything. Did not state the company she works for or the name of the “firm” I’m supposed to call.
In either case, take notes of the conversation. In the event they sue you (which would be very rare if either of the scenarios I described are correct) you could show up and explain to the judge how they did not comply with the FDCPA. You could rent an attorney to sue them. If you win you would be entitled to damages and they would have to pay your attorney fees.
Why not send all your correspondence thru the mail since you have all this info on me. He said he would and wishes me luck. The scammers use several names like Daniel Richards, Dominic Jones, Angelina Parker and gives you a bogus address in Irvine (the idiot can not even pronounce Irvine, he goes to Irwine) when his phone does not registry East of San Francisco Ca. Please do not be intimidated by these people. Since a lot of our companies are in the US outsourced most of our call center
I got scammed. I am inthe process of settling the loan, but getting calls from people claiming to state state attorneys and one claiming to be an investigator or a detective and want me to settle out of court and make payment to him. He claims I will be arested and put in jail.
Perhaps a solution of sorts-something that is better, but not perfect-could come from more modest reforms to the payday-lending industry, rather than trying to transform it. There are some evidence that smart regulation can improve the business for both lenders and consumers. In 2010, Colorado revised its payday-lending industry by reducing the permissible fees, extending the minimum term of a loan to six months, and requiring that a loan be repayable over time, instead of coming due all at once. Pew reports that half of the payday stores in Colorado are closed, but now everyday payday borrowers are paying 42% less in fees and defaulting less frequently, with no reduction in access to credit. “There’s been a debate for 20 years about whether to allow payday lending or not,” says Pew’s Alex Horowitz. “Colorado shows it can be much, better.”
DEYOUNG: If we take an objective look at the folks who use payday lending, what we find is that most users of the product are very satisfied with the product. Survey results show that almost 90 percent of the users of the product say that they are either somewhat satisfied or very satisfied with the product afterwards.
No Brittany p not being able to pay a debt will not land you in jail nor can not pay a debt fraud. They may be able to sue you for the debt, but if that happens you must be legally served with a notice of the lawsuit. Is this an old payday loan or are you back on a recent one?

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